Ultra high res 360 pano from Hvaler Archipelago

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terje.mathisen
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Ultra high res 360 pano from Hvaler Archipelago

Post by terje.mathisen » Wed Jul 28, 2004 3:26 pm

I have just (after a few days work) finished my largest (so far) single-row pano: I took 57 (handheld) images at maximum tele (about 140 mm equiv) from the top of the cairn at a small knoll.

In theory, the 10+ degree HFOV of my Oly 8080 would have been able to cover the circle with less than 40 exposures, but since I had to do this handheld (I was balancing on top of the loose rocks on the top of the cairn to get above nearby obstructions), I took quite a few more than this.

The result was optimized to generate an image of 78000x4000 pixels, i.e. too large for the regular PSD format.

I did it by splitting the project into three parts, 120 degrees apart, with each part covering 130 degrees. Each part contained 20-23 images in TIFF_m format which I manually merged into a 28167x4000 result.

The final merging of the three parts took a lot of resources, a 2 GB dual Xeon workstation with a pair of big disks was barely enough.

After vertical cropping I was left with about 210+ Mpix, which means that I'm even more impressed with Max's Gpix images!

Here is a small detail image:
Image

Here is a link to a previous quarter-size (19500 wide) version of the full 360-degree pano (3.8 MB):
http://www.norloff.org/pano/tele360-19500.jpg

Terje

JKH
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Post by JKH » Wed Jul 28, 2004 9:36 pm

Terje, that is one impressive image. I was unaware of the size limitation in outputting psd files. I’ll have to read more about that little issue. You did an excellent job keeping the camera level all the way around for this handheld 360 images. I probably would have lost so much off the top and bottom I’d have been left with only a few inches of height in my final image.

John

Serg
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Post by Serg » Thu Jul 29, 2004 12:02 am

Terje, perfect work!
Especially considering handheld images. How did you manage camera level keeping? Any special methods?

GURL
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Post by GURL » Thu Jul 29, 2004 9:02 am

... So that 360°, 40+ photos, "sky line" panoramas are possible hand held (including when horizon is visible and must be really straight). OK, I will remember that, thank you !

Does the relative "darkness" of the sky and land at 90° from the sun direction corresponds to what you saw ? (sun is very low on the horizon and this is a far from my own country.) The right exposure and white balance for 360° panoramas are problems I'm not at ease with, especially when sky is clear and sun is low...
Last edited by GURL on Fri Jul 30, 2004 7:00 am, edited 2 times in total.

The New Guy
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Post by The New Guy » Thu Jul 29, 2004 6:29 pm

What an incredible image!

(Also, fyi, Photoshop CS now supports images up to 300,000 x 300,000 pixels.)

terje.mathisen
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Post by terje.mathisen » Wed Aug 11, 2004 5:09 am

JKH wrote:Terje, that is one impressive image. I was unaware of the size limitation in outputting psd files. I’ll have to read more about that little issue. You did an excellent job keeping the camera level all the way around for this handheld 360 images. I probably would have lost so much off the top and bottom I’d have been left with only a few inches of height in my final image.

John
The size limit is 30,000 pixels for the original PSD format, PS 8 (i.e. PS CS) has a new PSB (PS Big?) format which can go much larger.

I used that to do the final merging of the three 130-degree part-images.

Keeping the camera level isn't too hard actually when you have a centered marker in the view-finder, in my case the primary focus/light meter rectangle. The only problem is that as soon as I half-press, that marker will move to whatever part of the image was selected as 'representative' by the camera logic, i.e. I simply have to keep it stable at that point.

Terje

terje.mathisen
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Post by terje.mathisen » Wed Aug 11, 2004 5:16 am

GURL wrote:... So that 360°, 40+ photos, "sky line" panoramas are possible hand held (including when horizon is visible and must be really straight). OK, I will remember that, thank you !
The visible horizon does not make it any harder, quite the opposite!

It is the horizon line which makes it possible to do this without wobbling up and down too much. In fact, the only problems I had were in the land-side parts, where I didn't have an exact horizon line to point at.
Does the relative "darkness" of the sky and land at 90° from the sun direction corresponds to what you saw ? (sun is very low on the horizon and this is a far from my own country.) The right exposure and white balance for 360° panoramas are problems I'm not at ease with, especially when sky is clear and sun is low...
Darkness at 90 degree offset is probably correct, since at that angle you'd tend to get minimum reflection of the incoming sunlight.

Here in southern Norway we're at around 60 degrees north, which means that the sun can never get any higher than about 30 degrees, plus up to 23 degrees (corresponding to axial tilt) around midsummer.

This means that it is often impossible to avoid more or less direct sunlight into any 360 pano. I simply accept that this has to be overexposed, and try to lock the exposure to the brightest parts of the remainder.

Terje

GURL
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Post by GURL » Wed Aug 11, 2004 12:07 pm

terje.mathisen wrote:Darkness at 90 degree offset is probably correct, since at that angle you'd tend to get minimum reflection of the incoming sunlight.
Here in southern Norway we're at around 60 degrees north, which means that the sun can never get any higher than about 30 degrees, plus up to 23 degrees (corresponding to axial tilt) around midsummer.
This means that it is often impossible to avoid more or less direct sunlight into any 360 pano. I simply accept that this has to be overexposed, and try to lock the exposure to the brightest parts of the remainder.
Franck Charel just published a second book, Corse 360°, where all images are 360° panoramas (most taken on the sea side) 2 or 3 pages wide (up to 48" x 8"!). He is not affraid of large brightness variations (he uses Velvia film and probably a Roundshoot camera)
(Those links now work!)

Image

Image

Image

Image


As I like your image and Franck Charel ones, I conclude I'm too timid with my own 360°.
For the last one: Image
I waited until midday near june 21 and it worked fine, though! (this link now works)
Last edited by GURL on Mon Aug 16, 2004 9:40 am, edited 1 time in total.

ColetaSoft
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Post by ColetaSoft » Wed Aug 11, 2004 6:01 pm

Pre CS .PSD limit = 30.000 px (either dimension)

CS .PSD limit = 300.000 px (either dimension)


I´ve had to use it a couple of times, and it pretty awsome how it can optimize file handling.

alexandre jenny
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Post by alexandre jenny » Mon Aug 16, 2004 3:24 am

Franck charel is using a roundshot with different exposure and them he collapse the different exposure.
His preceeding book was 'bretagne 360' which is really awesome.
For the story, he was assistant of Yann Artus Bertrand during 5 yers for his world famous book "la terre vue du ciel" before starting his own photographic work.

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